Ships

strangerthings1

I can’t sleep yet, on account of bad food decisions and maybe too much time today. This isn’t going to be very clear. Forgive me, future self.

Like the rest of the world, we finished off Stranger Things 2 last week, but I haven’t properly processed post-mortem perspectives about it until right now, on account of last Monday being a Monday: it came with that sort of numbing adrenaline rush you dive into headfirst, much like the cold shower you jump into just to get it over with – you’re not happy about it, but it’s happening anyway. Also, I had to finish the Beyond aftershow special as well, made all the more charming by Jim Rash – Netflix knows us so well, doesn’t it? And how well it is shaping us too – more on that later. I feel like I have much more to write about the peripherals of the entire experience – binge-watching culture, the context of adults finding escapism with a set of well-cast, perfectly-mannered talented white kids – than the actual content of the show itself. Continue reading “Ships”

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Who Dictates What We See?

(A draft of a portion of a paper submitted to my Media 250 class)

“In countries where levels of power are in the hands of a state bureaucracy, the monopolistic control over the media, often supplemented by official censorship, makes it clear that the media serve the ends of a dominant elite. It is much more difficult to see a propaganda system at work where the media are private and formal censorship is absent.” – From Manufacturing Consent by Edward Herman (1988)

This is the Philippine media’s situation today. Over the years, advertising and other forms of funding has been pivotal in dictating the content that we see across the broadcasting systems. Format became increasingly commercialized, especially during “primetime” hours (late night and noon time) because “advertisers will want, more generally, to avoid programs with serious complexities and disturbing controversies that interfere with the buying mood (Herman 1988).” Personalities that were put in the forefront depended on who could rack up the most endorsements (this is more latent in the magazine and film industry). As it happened, these media outfits also avoided criticizing companies or activities that belonged under the umbrella of their big CEOs. If any gatekeeping would take place, it was usually at the expense of a rival company or network. Continue reading “Who Dictates What We See?”

Analyzing Definitions of “Political Economy” As Applied To Media

The study of media, at its very core, is about understanding how people within a community (whether a local or a global one) receive and relay information or messages with one another. We use media to relay those content, and when we look at its existing forms – i.e. TV, Web, Print, or Radio – and analyze how they work, it is important to further understand who controls the mediums and how it affects the information being distributed. This kind of analysis goes under the umbrella of studying political economy – with media being identified as a process, or a way of relation, between the people. Continue reading “Analyzing Definitions of “Political Economy” As Applied To Media”

Analyzing Definitions of “Political Economy” As Applied To Media

The study of media, at its very core, is about understanding how people within a community (whether a local or a global one) receive and relay information or messages with one another. We use media to relay those content, and when we look at its existing…

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